Year-end thoughts

Between the books you bought and what I gave away, somewhere around five hundred of you have read Soul Identity. A big THANK YOU to all of you, and please tell your friends about it!

The end of the year is rushing at us. I thought I’d take a moment to reflect on the writing lessons I’ve learned this year:

  1. Writing is easier than it looks, and it’s lots of fun to live in the dreamworld of the first draft.
  2. But writing is just the tip of the iceberg: revising, rewriting, and editing make up the bulk of time spent on a book.
  3. Procrastinating on research drastically increases the time spent refactoring a story.
  4. Writers have to be sensitive enough to create ficticious worlds, but hardened enough to handle real-life criticism.
  5. Amazon’s Kindle just may work. I want to figure out how to sell better in an electronic world.
  6. Lousy and well-promoted outsells great and obscure. Here’s to the end of obscurity!

I published Soul Identity in July, and immediately started writing Soul Intent. I also had a lot of fun on the Amazon Discussions, and ended up reading over 30 self-published books this year (check out my Amazon Listmania to see which ones), and that taught me a lot about what works and what doesn’t.

Happy new year, everyone! And if you haven’t read Soul Identity yet, may I humbly suggest that you put it on your new year’s resolutions?


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2 Responses to “Year-end thoughts”

  1. I read a ton of self-pubs this year. For the most part, they have been much better reads than the books I purchase at bookstores. Of course, there are exceptions. There is a certain percentage of self-pubs that contain little to no editing, and are very clunky reads. But even those books would, most likely, read better than most I pull out of Barnes and Noble with a little elbow grease.

    I understand that my statements make it seem like I am bitter towards the publishing industry, but this is not the case. My personal library contains a 20:1 ratio of big name pubs to self-pubs.

    One thing I have learned is not to purchase a book merely on the cover art and back cover blurb, nor upon the promotion machine driving it. I always read the first page.

    Being a self-published author myself, I know it is possible to gain some momentum. I have sold more books than I could ever have imagined.

    Best of luck, and keep typing.

  2. I have just read Soul Identity on my iPod Touch and I loved it! Especially I loved Scott and his sceptical approach and ironical remarks! I liked the plot, but I think it could have been even edgier and sharper at certain parts…

    At the moment I am promoting an e-book GOG an End Time Mystery by Dan Richardson that I have taken initiative to digitally publish and distribute.

    I do agree with S William Show comment: One thing I have learned is not to purchase a book merely on the cover art and back cover blurb, nor upon the promotion machine driving it. I always read the first page.

    I have already downloaded two more self published books to read on my iPod Touch (both from smashwords.com). And I am waiting for my Kindle to arrive this Sunday!

    Anyway, I think it is a good blog that Dennis is writing, very helpful!

    Good work!!!!

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